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          1st Position Pentatonic Scale

  

   
  Pentatonic scales are widely used in rock, jazz, blues and
  country music. Let's start with the 1st position pentatonic
  scale. Pentatonic scales are fairly easy to play and are an
  excellent introduction into the world of scales. 

  Most guitarist's learn to play basic chord shapes in the 1st
  position so naturally we should learn this important scale
  in the same position.  Pentatonic scale patterns are also a
  useful tool for learning the fretboard in all keys. When we learn
  the 1st position pentatonic scale pattern we will in fact be
  learning both the major and minor pentatonic scale.

  Let's play the F minor pentatonic scale in the first position:

  Start by playing the sixth string, 1st fret with your first
  finger, this is the note F.

  Next play the sixth string, 4th fret with your fourth finger,
  this is the note Ab.

  Now play the fifth string, 1st fret with your first finger, this
  is the note Bb.

  Next play the fifth string, 3rd fret with your third finger, this
  is the note C.

  Finally, play the fourth string, 1st fret with your first finger,
  this is the note Eb.

  So, there you have it, your 1st position pentatonic scale the F
  minor pentatonic scale.

  Remember it's a five note scale.(penta = five)

  F minor pentatonic scale = F - Ab - Bb - C - Eb

  When you play the F minor pentatonic scale in the first position
  you will hear that if we only use the notes F, Ab, Bb, C and Eb
  the scale will sound unfinished so we can complete our scale by
  finishing on the note F one octave higher than our original F
  note.

  Here's our updated F minor pentatonic scale in the 1st position:

  Start by playing the sixth string, 1st fret with your first
  finger, this is the note F.

  Next play the sixth string, 4th fret with your fourth finger,
  this is the note Ab.

  Now play the fifth string, 1st fret with your first finger, this
  is the note Bb.

  Next play the fifth string, 3rd fret with your third finger, this
  is the note C.

  Now, play the fourth string, 1st fret with your first finger,
  this is the note Eb.

  Finally, finish on the fourth string, 3rd fret with your 3rd
  finger this is the note F (one octave higher than our original
  note F that was played on the sixth string 1st fret).

  You will hear this is a more complete sounding version of the F
  minor pentatonic scale, it's still a five note scale , even
  though we're playing six notes there is only five different notes
  being played as the first and last notes both share the same
  letter name F.

  Now let's play the same F minor pentatonic scale one octave
  higher while still playing in the first position.

  Start on the fourth string, 3rd fret with your 3rd finger this is
  the note F.

  Next play the third string, 1st fret with your first finger, this
  is the note Ab.

  Now play the third string, 3rd fret with your third finger, this
  is the note Bb.

  Next play the second string, 1st fret with your first finger,
  this is the note C.

  Now, play the second string, 4th fret with your fourth finger,
  this is the note Eb.

  Finally, finish on the first string, 1st fret with your first
  finger this is the note F (one octave higher than the
  F note played on the fourth string 3rd fret).

  By playing the Minor Pentatonic Scale so frequently, our fret
  hand develops a motor skill memory for the characteristic 2-note-
  per-string pattern of these scales.

  Pentatonic scales are among the most important scales in modern
  guitar music apart from the fact that pentatonic scales are
  simpler and generally easier to play than diatonic scales, the
  pentatonic pattern you have just learnt can be used for both the
  minor pentatonic and major pentatonic scales, simply by starting
  on a different note.

  Compare the notes of the Ab major pentatonic scale.

  Ab - Bb - C - Eb - F

  to the notes of the F minor pentatonic scale

  F - Ab - Bb - C - Eb

  Can you see they are exactly the same notes in a different
  sequence?

  Let's play the 1st position pentatonic scale in the first
  position this time as an Ab major pentatonic scale.

  Start with the sixth string, 4th fret with your fourth finger,
  this is the note Ab.

  Now play the fifth string, 1st fret with your first finger, this
  is the note Bb.

  Next play the fifth string, 3rd fret with your third finger, this
  is the note C.

  Now, play the fourth string, 1st fret with your first finger,
  this is the note Eb.

  Next play the fourth string, 3rd fret with your third finger,
  this is the note F.

  Finally, finish on the third string, 1st fret with your 1st
  finger this is the note Ab (one octave higher than our original
  note Ab that was played on the sixth string 4th fret).

  You can extend the range of your Ab major pentatonic scale in the
  same way we did with the F minor pentatonic scale.

  Start on the third string, 1st fret with your first finger, this
  is the note Ab (the same note we finished the previous Ab major
  pentatonic scale on).

  Now play the third string, 3rd fret with your third finger, this
  is the note Bb.

  Next play the second string, 1st fret with your first finger,
  this is the note C.

  Now, play the second string, 4th fret with your fourth finger,
  this is the note Eb.

  Next play the first string 1st fret with your first finger, this
  is the note F.

  Finally, finish on the first string 4th fret with your fourth
  finger this is the note Ab (one octave higher than the
  Ab note played on the third string 1st fret).

  By learning the 1st position pentatonic scale pattern you will
  have mastered two important scales the major and minor pentatonic
  scales.



   

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